DNA Retention: Announcement of Government Proposal

Tue, Nov 17, 2009

Crime

11 November 2009

 

The Home Secretary Alan Johnson has today announced a series of proposals designed to ensure the right people are on the National DNA Database, as well as defining when people should come off the database.

 

The UK has become recognised as the world leader in developing the use of the national DNA database and catching criminals through reviews of cold cases.

 

The Government is clear that DNA and the use of forensics play an essential role in fighting crime and providing justice for victims.

 

Between April 1998 and September 2009 there were more than 410,589 crimes with DNA matches, providing the police with a lead on the possible identity of the offender.

 

Following a public consultation, the Government has listened to the range of comments and proposes to:

 

  • remove profiles of all adults arrested but not charged or convicted of any recordable offence after six years;
  • remove profiles of 16 and 17 year old juveniles arrested but not charged or convicted of serious offences after six years;
  • remove profiles of all other juveniles arrested but not charged or convicted of a recordable offence after 3 years, regardless of age at arrest; and
  • retain DNA profiles of all juveniles convicted of all but the most serious recordable offences for five years, and indefinitely for any further convictions.
  • retain DNA profiles of all adults convicted of a recordable offence indefinitely.

 

In addition, the proposals include:

 

  • Plans to destroy all DNA samples, such as blood, urine or mouth swabs used to create the DNA profile that is added to the database;
  • Plans to give police new powers to take DNA samples from anyone convicted abroad, or convicted before the levitra roma creation of the DNA database in 1995; and
  • Intends to continue retaining the DNA profiles of all adults convicted of a recordable offence indefinitely, as well as the profiles of all juveniles convicted of the most serious offences, such as murder, rape, manslaughter and serious assault.

 

Under the proposals, fingerprints will be retained for the same time periods as DNA profiles.

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